Elwy Schutten, History, pendant 2017, siver gold plated and soapstone
Elwy Schutten, History, pendant 2017, siver gold plated and soapstone

Elwy Schutten, History, pendant 2017, siver gold plated and soapstone
Elwy Schutten, Cracks, pendant 2017, silver gold plated and soapstone
Ammeli Engstrom, brooch 2017, fine silver
Ammeli Engstrom, necklace 2017, fine silver

Elwy Schutten
Culture and Identity

Elwy Schutten graduated in 2016 at the Maastricht Academy of Fine Arts and Design with a powerful collection of jewellery pieces cut from soapstone and alabaster. The collection, which had personal identity as a main theme, was shown at Ra Gallery afterwards. In 2017, Elwy developed a new collection during a working stint in Pforzheim, Germany, where she was allowed to make free use of an old industrial machine, called drophammer, and old stamps with all kinds of designs that in former times were used to make jewellery. Using the drophammer and the stamps to print figures in different combinations in thin sheets of silver, Elwy created patterns that evoke stories, associations and atmospheres from different cultures. In several pendants, she gave this silver ‘cultural identity’ a ‘personal identity’ with a layer of soapstone, thus questioning the relation and interaction between both identities.

Ammeli Engström
My Hands

Ammeli Engström graduated in 2017 at the Academy of Design and Craft in Gothenburg, Sweden. She explores weaving- and braiding-techniques in relation to the traditional function and meaning of jewellery. Weaving, braiding and ropes inspired her because of their close interconnection with the human body, in the form of (wearable) textiles and objects like bags and baskets. By cutting bands of paper-thin silver and weaving them she creates pieces of wearable ‘fabric’ and braided ropes with a soft shimmer that hints at the origin of the material. The jewellery pieces are rather large, but supple enough to adjust themselves to the clothes they are worn on. The techniques used by Ammeli are often associated with traditional female crafts, but the hands that do the weaving, knotting, braiding and roping are not soft and fragile but strong, persistent and tough.